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Ideas for student projects that reflect literacy 2 point 0 skills

Page history last edited by Roxann Nys 8 years, 8 months ago

Examples of student projects that reflect literacy 2.0 skills:

Reading and Writing Grade 4

  • Read and skim pre-selected print and online materials on pre-civil war occupations. Search the American Memory database (or a similar sponsored digital archive) for relevant and interesting images, textual explanations, and sound files.
  • Use pre-selected magazines, books, and newspapers for information on local or regional authors. Create a keyword list for online searches on the author and his or her famous works.
  • As a group, select a class reading and contact the author for an online or face-to-face class discussion of that work (skypeanauthor.wetpaint.com/  teachingbooks.net)
  • Collect information on appropriate gaming systems that require students to read (and write) and navigate complicated online spaces. If technically possible, demonstrate the navigation and reading skills required to use these games (www.marcprensky.com for your background info on gaming, Thinkfinity.org)
  • Compare reading skills used in reading a novel with the skills used in reading a newspaper article, an email, a chat format, a note from a friend, or a chapter in the class science textbook   
  • Research a great thinker or writer; locating, evaluating and collecting information from a variety of sources; and presenting findings through a multi-media presentation in the form of a piece of art, (Glogster.edu) an original song, a news review, or a slideshow
  • Present a survey (Google Forms) of the digital and non-digital technologies fellow students use in the course of a typical week, explaining how these technologies affected their abilities to learn and communicate
  • Complete a presentation using presentation tools (try Prezi.com) as a class with each student assuming responsibility for one or two slides
  • Respond to an online message board responding to questions concerning literary texts
  • Create a class literary magazine (for a digital magazine (try issuu.com or paper.li for a digital newspaper pulled from web-based resources)
  • Contribute to a storytelling website in conjunction with a local civic organization

 

READING and WRITING  Grade 8:

  • Survey and compare movie viewing habits and popular types of movies and titles with a partner class in another region or country. Include a well-formatted bibliography of the most popular movies. Analyze the results for trends or conclusions. Compare the results with national surveys. (Global Collaborative Projects info page, ePals, CILC.org-collaboration center)
  • Search information from a variety of print, online, and non-print sources for a report on a topic of personal interest related to the Holocaust. Evaluate the information using criteria for validity and reliability. Give rationale for any sources suspected to be unreliable.
  • From a favorite magazine, choose a variety of advertisements of products that are personally appealing. Analyze the techniques used by each advertisement to attract teen buyers.
  • Describe one’s own process for reading and evaluating a website or other text containing a variety of embedded links
  • Using a topic of interest (based on units covered in the class science, social studies, history, or math classes), create an annotated bibliography of important resource materials (books, newspapers, magazines, online sources, video, music, etc,). Include a working bibliography of sources consulted or skimmed but not selected
  • Interact with peers, authors, and others using collaborative telecommunications tools (i.e., email, threaded discussion, audio and video conferencing) to conduct literature circles on a novel read in common. (skypeanauthor.wetpaint.com/  teachingbooks.net)
  • Conduct research on an award-winning adolescent literature book they have read. After researching the author and award, students write a review for the children’s section of the local newspaper, or for school newspaper
  • Compose a team short-story presentation that includes a script, text, sound, images, and video clips. Create it around this question: “What would it be like to stand beside Martin Luther King, Jr. as he looks over thousands of Americans, their faces full of hope, and begins his famous speech, I Have a Dream ?”
  • Create an audio history presentation (suitable for school broadcast if possible) by producing audio profiles of students’ parental occupations
  • Complete a collaborative research project that utilizes online research methods.
  • In the novel The Last Book in the Universe, by Rodman Philbrick, the main character poses the question: “Why bother to read any more if you can just probe [experience the world exclusively through virtual “reality”]?” Participate in a panel discussion, giving a reaction to this question from one of these viewpoints: William Shakespeare, a Sony executive in charge of the PlayStation division, a science fiction author, a student of 1990, a student of 2050.
  • Collaborate with mentors or peer groups to generate shared questions and lines of inquiry
  • Participate in class discussions of peer reviewed writing to select pieces for a class anthology (start by putting the reviews on VoiceThread for commentary)
  • Develop and publish a collaborative essay  (Google Docs)
  • Create and record a parody of a familiar song, echoing the original rhyme scheme and rhythm, and creating a humorous or satiric effect
  • Compile a digital classroom anthology (e.g., on CD, DVD, or web published) of student work in a variety of genres on the theme “Where I’m From” (Consider a wiki or Google Site to house the anthology)
  • Using a video camera, record a montage of scenes from a classroom or the school as a whole, creating special effects with shooting angles, range, lighting, composition, camera features. Describe the impact of these effects.
  • Fulfill individual roles in a Webquest researching a topic of local interest and creating an informative newscast using the findings
  • Analyze the effectiveness of the interaction in a group problem solving task such as solving a mini-mystery with each group member having only a small piece of the information.
  • Create a class survey on the various communication methods class members have used outside school in the last month. (Google Forms)
  • Collaborate with email pals and online mentors from other cultures and geographical areas in order to write a collaborative essay or create an interactive, interpretive project i.e., on Mark Twain’s America. ((Global Collaborative Projects info page, ePals, CILC.org-collaboration center 
  • Use a wiki (a web-based collaboration tool) or other discussion tool like a weblog to create and maintain a dialogue journal discussing the reading of a shared text with a partner or group. (pbWorks, Wikispaces, Blogger, Google Sites)
  • Participate in the class interpretive community through class opinion bulletin boards or interactive graphs, class response walls featuring marginal notes captured on sticky notes, or posting graphic representations of understanding such as timelines, picture maps or storyboards. (Timeline Creator, VoiceThread, consider using one of the many comic creators for a storyboard)
  • Make responsible decisions about use of material based on the rules governing intellectual property, trademark, copyright, fair use and plagiarism (CopyrightKids.org, Library of Congress-Taking the Mystery out of Copyright)

 

READING and WRITING Grade 12

  • Analyze the portrayal of bosses in popular media (comic strips, TV comedies, TV dramas, movies), identifying stereotypes found and identifying the kinds of “real life” bosses that are not included.
  • Choose a social issue or controversy that has been a subject of protest songs. Using primary sources (print, digital, or community resources), research an aspect of the issue to use as background in writing an original protest song or lyrics
  • Identify characteristics of suspect information that may indicate it is an internet hoax, fraudulent activity or an unreliable source
  • Distinguish satire and parody from other non-ironic forms of expression (Some Weird Al Jankovic videos might work for this-be careful!)
  • Identify, read, and navigate multiple resources and information venues for a chosen interest area or occupation. These resources should include collections of books, print and online magazines and journals, websites, email lists, professional blogs, and other forms of professional interactions between members of the chosen field. Create a chart of the personal responses (both positive and negative) of this occupation
  • Interpret the status of the materials they read, collect, transfer, and use based on the current conventions governing intellectual property, trademark, copyright, Fair Use and plagiarism
  • Navigate a non-linear text (such as tutorials written in individualized, hyperlinked power-point presentations, or a non-linear film) to access relevant information or to follow the sequence cues of non-linear narratives (Wikipedia is the largest non-linear text online today)
  • Select and organize abundant materials (digital and print) according to the basic principles of information management. Read and understand the organizational efforts of others. Students can demonstrate this by creating a substantial web site of personal portfolio materials that is not only easy to navigate and read at the interface level, but also organized and understandable at the file-management level. (Livebinders)
  • Write and illustrate a brochure introducing a classmate to a classic book, film, web site, musical, etc. Then, combining audio and video formats, create a persuasive presentation for classmates about it. Describe the advantages of brochures and audio/video presentations for a particular audience member in a specific situation. (Word, article w/tips and tools for creating online brochures)
  • Construct a virtual museum exhibit depicting the role of the American Dream in classic texts/novels/literature                                  (Educational Virtual Museums Developed Using PowerPoint)
  • Maintain a generative self-reflective journal (either print or online) that is utilized and referenced throughout the development of a project or unit. (pbWorks, Wikispaces, Blogger, Google Sites)
  • For a selected topic, evaluate the accuracy, relevance, appropriateness, comprehensiveness, and bias of electronic information sources
  • Participate in an online interactive debate with student panels and evaluator-experts
  • As an analysis of the work of an influential film director, annotate video sources to identify key scenes and/or information, react and respond to content, and communicate interpretations and understanding to a select audience
  • Create digital videos that present a persuasive argument that calls for social action or community change
  • Create multimedia presentations to communicate multiple levels of understanding on a specified topic
  • Use productivity tools to publish a class anthology of book reviews of novels read during a unit on international authors
  • Interact thoughtfully with class members in a class-created chat room for responses to novels
  • Assume the persona of a character from multicultural literature in collaboration with e-pals from across the world and research the culture and ideologies of that character
  • Use video cameras and editing software to create a DVD of a collaboratively written play
  • Complete complex, higher-level projects utilizing a diverse range of resources including media, personal interviews, and group presentations
  • Create and produce a DVD or website promoting personal responsibility (pbWorks, Wikispaces, Blogger, Google Sites)
  • Make responsible decisions about use of material based on the rules governing intellectual property, trademark, copyright, fair use and plagiarism   (CreativeCommons.org, ReadWriteThink lesson plan)
  • Make a product that demonstrates understanding that critical literacy reaches beyond print materials
  • Demonstrate how to take responsibility for personal communications, websites, and other information products
  • Develop a cartoon or video to raise awareness of fraudulent practices, Internet theft, threats to personal information (ReadWriteThink Comic Creator, Pixton, ToonDo
  • Reach out to those who have no access to technology, with an affordable or free device.
  • Create a collage of the the value of information technology for their future careers (Glogster.edu)

     

MATH Grade 4

Use newspapers, books, spreadsheets, graphing programs, calculators, computers, Internet, films, TV programs, Websites, databases, internet ;

Word processing programs, graphic programs, presentation software, desktop publishing programs, manipulatives, calculators, graphing calculators, spreadsheet software, probes, GPS, geometry tool software, interactive boards, handhelds, digital cameras, multimedia presentation software, probes/CBRs, Website development software and digital libraries to:

  • Access information from a variety of media sources
  • Gather data such as taking surveys of their school or community population and create appropriate graphs to display the information
  • Analyze and compare numerical data from a variety of age-appropriate sources such as newspapers and websites, and draw simple conclusions about the data
  • Present mathematical information in an oral report accompanied by charts and graphs
  • Construct charts and graphs to display mathematical information such as survey data
  • Use presentation software to present data used in a graph or project (such as a budget, scientific report, or economic analysis)
  • Apply a variety of age-appropriate strategies to solve simple open-ended problems with real-life applications, such as comparison shopping, time-distance, or measurement and proportion problems
  • Use word processing or online forums to record journal entries of their math experiences
  • Use presentation software to share their problem-solving strategies
  • Plan, visualize, estimate, measure, test and revise their understanding of geometric shapes and measurement concepts
  • Visually demonstrate, highlight and display various patterns and relationships among numbers using virtual whiteboards and calculators
  • Use digital cameras to photograph representations of geometry concepts from their surroundings
  • Transfer the photo images to create a math slide show
  • Give a presentation for an audience to explain geometry concepts
  • Create an age-appropriate portfolio that includes a problem-solving situation related to real life
  • Create a self-assessment for evaluating a variety of age-appropriate concepts, and provide a written reflection of their problem-solving process/thinking
  • Create an age-appropriate portfolio that includes a problem-solving situation related to real life
  • Create a test with a variety of concepts, and a written reflection of their problem-solving process/thinking
  • Establish ongoing communication with students from other communities or countries (via letters, email, or electronic bulletin boards) to share math projects
  • Develop and execute a plan to use measurements and a graphing program to collect and record accurate and
  • Complete data about the community playgrounds
  • Use  age-appropriate mathematical and ICT skills to participate in a community service project

 

MATH Grade 8

Use newspapers, books, spreadsheets, graphing programs, calculators, computers, Internet, films, TV programs, Websites, databases, internet;

Word processing programs, graphic programs, presentation software, desktop publishing programs, manipulatives, calculators, graphing calculators, spreadsheet software, probes, GPS, geometry tool software, interactive boards, handhelds, digital cameras, multimedia presentation software, probes/CBRs, Website development software and digital libraries to:

  • Find, access, and acquire the necessary data needed to address a question generated by students
  • Formulate questions related to students’ physical environment or two populations or cultures, design studies that can answer the questions, and collect appropriate data
  • Analyze graphs and other data representations from the media relative to their truthfulness and ability to persuade/mislead a reader
  • Prepare oral presentations of group math projects that demonstrate conceptual understanding as well as application in a specific context
  • Present written explanation of problem solving process and solution with included diagrams, tables, charts, and graphs as needed
  • Use linked table, graph, and symbolic representations (as can be displayed in a spreadsheet) to explain how components of a real-world situation are connected and how changes impact the entire system
  • Solve problems using computation, customary and metric measurements, scale factors, ratios, and proportions
  • Create graphical representations of data using graphing calculators and spreadsheets
  • Select and apply appropriate problem-solving strategies in an online group
  • Solve real-life problems involving money, such as using existing e-commerce
  • Use physical and digital models to demonstrate mathematical concepts
  • Use calculators to solve computational problems
  • Use mathematical understanding and problem-solving processes to identify a community problem (such as using a limited number of buses for an expanding student body).
  • Generate and analyze possible solutions for the community problem
  • Create an age-appropriate portfolio that includes a problem-solving situation related to real life
  • Create a self-assessment for evaluating a variety of age-appropriate concepts, and provide a written reflection of their problem-solving process/thinking
  • Gather pertinent data from multiple sources to create a math game that reflects concepts from class and explain the game through appropriate channels (e.g., hand in manually; send as email attachment; or present orally)
  • Participate in national math competitions, where students are responsible for the quality of the data they submit
  • Gather and critically analyze data from a variety of sources, and understand how and why data may not be consistent
  • Incorporate math concepts into a community service project such as a recycling program – and research facts to determine how much of the recycled parts are used in various items

 

Math Grade 12

Use newspapers, books, spreadsheets, graphing programs, calculators, computers, Internet, films, TV programs, Websites, databases, internet;

Word processing programs, graphic programs, presentation software, desktop publishing programs, manipulatives, calculators, graphing calculators, spreadsheet software, probes, GPS, geometry tool software, interactive boards, handhelds, digital cameras, multimedia presentation software, probes/CBRs, Website development software and digital libraries to:

  • Find and analyze data sets and collection processes with respect to the authenticity of the data and legitimacy of its use for various purposes
  • Develop methods to collect univariate and bivariate data to describe trends within and between populations or local settings
  • Use understanding of statistical techniques, sampling bias, and population parameters in simulated settings to study the effects on outcomes. Analyze these factors in published scientific or economic reports, and use knowledge of statistical techniques to evaluate the validity of the reports’ findings
  • Give an oral presentation using the language of mathematics to express mathematical ideas precisely to peers and teacher in content specific and applied settings
  • Create a written argument that demonstrates the development of a mathematical conjecture and creates a convincing proof of its validity or disproof
  • Creates a presentation that uses dynamic images to illustrate a mathematical concept, connection, or problem and its applicability to a real-world context
  • Employ more complex problem-solving methods to develop a deeper understanding of mathematics, such as simulating a construction project (within certain material & budget constraints).
  • Formulate, approach, and solve problems beyond those studied using a variety of problem-solving tools such as graphing calculators, probes, GPS, and geometry tool software.
  • Apply an appropriate strategy to solve problems both individually and in a group
  • Use estimation to determine the reasonableness of an answer and use word-processing software to explain the process
  • Use physical and digital models to demonstrate mathematical concepts
  • Use graphing calculators and probes to collect and analyze environmental data (e.g., pHof streams) or contextual data (e.g., speed of cars in school zones)
  • Develop an audience-appropriate presentation that uses analysis, interpretation and display of data and related inferences to describe the situation and possible solutions
  • Create a culminating project that demonstrates content knowledge and conceptual understanding in at least three distinct content areas; project should demonstrate problem-solving ability and ability to draw connections between mathematics content and real world setting
  • Work on higher level mathematics that can be submitted to an agency outside the classroom (e.g., national contest, local newspaper, math bee)
  • Use online bulletin boards to engage in discussions of math concepts with people (students and/or experts) from around the world; demonstrate tolerance and respect for the points of view of others
  • Identify a potential community issue that can be analyzed using a wide range of mathematical tools and develop an analysis plan
  • Collect and analyze data, and develop a report presenting data and possible interventions to address local issues 

 

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